Novak Djokovic turned down one lucrative offer that other players would not have

Most of us will not get to play Novak Djokovic in reality or in pretend.

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Many people are not gamers, but if most of us were offered millions of dollars to have our likeness used as part of a video game - or if we were the focus of the game - a lot of us would likely say, "Yes, please!" But not Novak Djokovic. Djokovic reportedly turned down an offer to be part of a video game and had a simple reason for his response.

During a recent conversation on the Tennis Channel, reporter Jon Wertheim and others were discussing about how driven Djokovic is to make himself as successful as possible. This includes being in complete control of his time and his diet. Several years ago, Novak Djokovic switched to a gluten-free and plant-based diet. Djokovic feels this is one reason he has been able to stay healthy and have great endurance during matches.

But one thing Djokovic did not want to do with his time was be involved with the process of letting his name and game be part of a video game. According to Wertheim, Djokovic said, "I don't believe in the product, this isn't a good use of my time." He could not have been more plain and simple.

A Novak Djokovic video game is not on the horizon

Not only did Djokovic not care about making some easy money, he would rather have focused on what made him happy while he was earning an income. Djokovic clearly loves to play tennis and loves winning tournaments.

More proof that Djokovic is a great player is that with his fourth-round victory at the Australian Open over Adrian Mannarino, the Serb reached his 58th Grand Slam quarterfinal. This ties Roger Federer for the most major quarterfinals reached in the Open era. Very likely, Djokovic will break the record in the next Grand Slam, the French Open.

And maybe in a few years, Novak Djokovic will have reached 70 quarterfinals. He said after beating Mannarino that he would not find it right to quit playing now. As long as he is near the top ranking and still winning majors, he owes it to the sport to stick around.

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